ecs-dockerswarm

/Archived Open Source Project

ecs-dockerswarm

Deploy EMC's ECS as a multi-node Docker container setup using Docker Compose into a Docker Swarm cluster created by Docker Machine.

Description

EMC Elastic Cloud Storage (ECS) is a software-defined cloud storage platform that exposes S3, Swift, and Atmos endpoints. This walk-through will demonstate the setup of a 3 Node ECS Cluster using Docker containers and Docker tools.

Requirements

  • Each ECS node requires 16GB of RAM and an attached volume with a minimum of 512GB. The attached volume stores persistent data that is replicated between three nodes.
  • Docker Machine installed on your local laptop. Use 0.3.0-rc2 or later Docker Machine Releases or until all --swarm commands are merged into a stable release.
  • Docker Compose installed on your local laptop. Use 1.3.0 RC2 or later Docker Compose Releases.
  • Docker Client installed on your local laptop. (follow Docker Client installation directions)
This is for test and development purposes. Not for production use. Please reach out to your local EMC SE for information on production usage. EMC ECS ships as a commodity storage appliance for production use.

Lets Get Going

Setup 3 Ubuntu Hosts with Docker Swarm using Docker Machine

The following examples use Ubuntu. Ubuntu is a requirement for using the setup scripts. Docker Machine examples are shown with the AWS driver with the standard Ubuntu AMI. However, any cloud or compatible infrastructure with Docker Machine can be used.
  1. At this beta stage, the security of ports hasn't been defined. For this to work properly, ports 0-65535 need opened inbound to each of your Docker Machine hosts. Within AWS, this is called a Security Group more port information can be found on the ECS Security Configuration Guide

  2. Create a Docker Swarm ID.

    1. This can be done by using docker run swarm:0.3.0-rc2 create on any host that can run Docker. If no host is available, use Docker Machine to create the host:
    docker-machine -D create --driver amazonec2 --amazonec2-access-key MYKEY --amazonec2-secret-key MYSECRETKEY --amazonec2-vpc-id vpc-myvpc swarm-create
    
    1. Connect to the Docker Machine: docker-machine env swarm-create
    2. Get shell access: eval "$(docker-machine env swarm-create)"
    3. Run the Swarm container: docker run swarm:0.3.0-rc2 create (currently must use the latest which is v0.3.0-rc2 to support Docker Compose)
    4. The output will have a unique token such as b353bb30194d59ab33e4d47c012ee895.
  3. Create a Docker Swarm 3 node cluster using Docker Machine. Each node requires:
    • a root drive of >=20GB
    • 28GB RAM or more
    • A Swarm token using image 0.3.0-rc2 or higher or until this is merged until this becomes the stable release
    1. Create Swarm Master:
    docker-machine -D create --driver amazonec2 --amazonec2-access-key MYKEY --amazonec2-secret-key MYSECRETKEY --amazonec2-vpc-id vpc-myvpc --amazonec2-instance-type r3.xlarge --amazonec2-root-size 50 --swarm --swarm-image=swarm:0.3.0-rc2 --swarm-master --swarm-discovery token://b353bb30194d59ab33e4d47c012ee895 swarm-master
    
    1. Create Node 01:
    docker-machine -D create --driver amazonec2 --amazonec2-access-key MYKEY --amazonec2-secret-key MYSECRETKEY --amazonec2-vpc-id vpc-myvpc --amazonec2-instance-type r3.xlarge --amazonec2-root-size 50 --swarm --swarm-image=swarm:0.3.0-rc2 --swarm-discovery token://b353bb30194d59ab33e4d47c012ee895 swarm-node01
    
    1. Create Node 02:
    docker-machine -D create --driver amazonec2 --amazonec2-access-key MYKEY --amazonec2-secret-key MYSECRETKEY --amazonec2-vpc-id vpc-myvpc --amazonec2-instance-type r3.xlarge --amazonec2-root-size 50 --swarm --swarm-image=swarm:0.3.0-rc2 --swarm-discovery token://b353bb30194d59ab33e4d47c012ee895 swarm-node02
    
  • note: The -D flag is used to look at diagnostics. It's not necessary, but helpful when looking for bugs since this all requires the Release Candidate versions of all tooling

Add A Volume to Each Node

Docker containers, by nature, are used for stateless applications. By attaching an outside volume (not the root volume), data persistence is achieved. The container running the ECS software is ephemeral and the volume containing the data can be attached to any ECS container. All ECS nodes replicate data to one another and store logs in this attached Volume. The volume needs to be >=512GB. After the volume has been added, retrieve the mounted path. For instance, AWS uses /dev/xvdf. This can be retrieved by using docker-machine ssh swarm-master "sudo fdisk -l", which shows the disk layout for the swarm-master machine. This example shows how to attach a volume using AWS.
  1. Login to the AWS Console
  2. Navigate to EC2 -> Volumes -> Create Volume
  3. Set the size to 512 or greater
  4. Set the Availability Zone to where your Docker Machine Hosts reside.
  5. Repeat this 2 more times so there are 3 Volumes
  6. Select 1 volume and navigate to Actions -> Attach Volume
  7. Attach 1 unique volume per Docker Machine Swarm host. Do not attach all three volumes to all three hosts.

Prepare the hosts

Each host requires a script to be ran that prepares the volumes attached as XFS and builds a multitude of folders and permissions.
  1. Using Docker Machine, download the setup script from this repo docker-machine ssh swarm-master "curl -O https://raw.githubusercontent.com/emccode/ecs-dockerswarm/master/docker-machine-hostprep.sh" docker-machine ssh swarm-node01 "curl -O https://raw.githubusercontent.com/emccode/ecs-dockerswarm/master/docker-machine-hostprep.sh" docker-machine ssh swarm-node02 "curl -O https://raw.githubusercontent.com/emccode/ecs-dockerswarm/master/docker-machine-hostprep.sh"
  2. The hosts require the internal IPs of all the ECS nodes in the cluster. You can retrieve all external IPs with docker-machine ls (not needed):
    NAME        ACTIVE   DRIVER      STATE     URL                     SWARM
    swarm-create   *   amazonec2   Running   tcp://52.4.23.123:2376
    swarm-master       amazonec2   Running   tcp://52.7.13.18:2376    swarm-master (master)
    swarm-node01       amazonec2   Running   tcp://54.12.23.16:2376   swarm-master
    swarm-node02       amazonec2   Running   tcp://52.7.19.173:2376   swarm-master
    
    You will need to go into your cloud provider and get the internal IP addresses for each node. This will hopefully be added to docker-machine in the near future. Pay attention to Issue #1342 FR: Get internal IP of cloud hosted machine for when it will be baked into the master release.

  3. The command to kick-off the host preparation accepts two arguments.

    1. all three internal IP addresses as comma seperated values with no spaces such as 172.38.13.18,172.38.23.16,172.38.19.173
    2. the mounted drive path without the /dev/ portion such as xvdf. If no argument is specified, xvdf is the default.
    docker-machine ssh swarm-master "sudo sh docker-machine-hostprep.sh 172.38.13.18,172.38.23.16,172.38.19.173 xvdf"
    docker-machine ssh swarm-node01 "sudo sh docker-machine-hostprep.sh 172.38.13.18,172.38.23.16,172.38.19.173 xvdf"
    docker-machine ssh swarm-node02 "sudo sh docker-machine-hostprep.sh 172.38.13.18,172.38.23.16,172.38.19.173 xvdf"
    
  4. The last output line will say Host has been successfully prepared

Docker Compose Up

The docker-compose.yml file will create 3 ECS containers including all volume mounts and networking.
  1. Connect to the Docker Machine Swarm instance: docker-machine env --swarm swarm-master
  2. Get shell access to the Swarm Cluster: eval "$(docker-machine env --swarm swarm-master)"
  3. To test if swarm is working correctly, run docker info and you will see an output such as:
Containers: 4
Images: 3
Storage Driver:
Strategy: spread
Filters: affinity, health, constraint, port, dependency
Nodes: 3
 swarm-master: 52.7.13.18:2376
  └ Containers: 2
  └ Reserved CPUs: 0 / 4
  └ Reserved Memory: 0 B / 15.42 GiB
 swarm-node01: 54.12.23.16:2376
  └ Containers: 1
  └ Reserved CPUs: 0 / 4
  └ Reserved Memory: 0 B / 15.42 GiB
 swarm-node02: 52.7.19.173:2376
  └ Containers: 1
  └ Reserved CPUs: 0 / 4
  └ Reserved Memory: 0 B / 15.42 GiB
Execution Driver:
Kernel Version:
Operating System:
CPUs: 12
Total Memory: 94.38 GiB
Name:
ID:
Http Proxy:
Https Proxy:
No Proxy:
  1. Copy this repo using git clone https://github.com/emccode/ecs-dockerswarm.git or save the docker-compose.yml file to a folder.
  2. Navigate to your folder such as ecs-dockerswarm
  3. Run docker-compose up -d. Docker Compose will be pointing towards the registerd Docker Client machine which is our swarm cluster:
Pulling ecsnode02 (emccorp/ecs-software)...
swarm-node01: Pulling emccorp/ecs-software... : downloaded
swarm-node02: Pulling emccorp/ecs-software... : downloaded
swarm-master: Pulling emccorp/ecs-software... : downloaded
Creating ecsdockerswarm_ecsnode02_1...
Creating ecsdockerswarm_ecsnode03_1...
Creating ecsdockerswarm_ecsnode01_1...
  1. Make sure all containers are up using docker ps and wait 10-15 minutes for ECS to completely load.
CONTAINER ID        IMAGE                      COMMAND                CREATED             STATUS              PORTS               NAMES
9054fc14ee5a        emccorp/ecs-software   "/opt/vipr/boot/boot   36 seconds ago      Up 35 seconds                           swarm-master/ecsdockerswarm_ecsnode01_1
a90ef32ce5ec        emccorp/ecs-software   "/opt/vipr/boot/boot   39 seconds ago      Up 38 seconds                           swarm-node01/ecsdockerswarm_ecsnode02_1
e6356782748c        emccorp/ecs-software   "/opt/vipr/boot/boot   39 seconds ago      Up 38 seconds                           swarm-node02/ecsdockerswarm_ecsnode03_1
Warning docker-compose.yml calls out the use of affinity rules based on the container name. If the container name is changed within the docker-compose.yml file, then the environment variable needs to be edited as well.

ECS UI Access

After a few minutes, the ECS UI will be available. To access the UI, point your browser to one of the Public IP addresses using https://. You can retrieve all external IPs with docker-machine ls (not needed): NAME ACTIVE DRIVER STATE URL SWARM swarm-create amazonec2 Running tcp://52.4.23.123:2376 swarm-master amazonec2 Running tcp://52.7.13.18:2376 swarm-master (master) swarm-node01 amazonec2 Running tcp://54.12.23.16:2376 swarm-master swarm-node02 amazonec2 Running tcp://52.7.19.173:2376 swarm-master Username: root Password: ChangeMe ecs-login-ui

ECS Object Preparation

At this point, there are still more steps to be completed like adding the license.xml, creating the object store, etc. These steps have been automated in object_prep.py. This script only needs to be run once per cluster. Download two files to one of the hosts:
docker-machine ssh swarm-master "curl -O https://raw.githubusercontent.com/emccode/ecs-dockerswarm/master/license.xml"
docker-machine ssh swarm-master "curl -O https://raw.githubusercontent.com/emccode/ecs-dockerswarm/master/object_prep.py"
Next, run the python script. In the ECSNodes flag, specify the Public IP address of one of the nodes. This script will take about 10-15 minutes to complete. Do not exit out of the script
docker-machine ssh swarm-master "sudo python object_prep.py --ECSNodes=52.7.13.18 --Namespace=ns1 --ObjectVArray=ova1 --ObjectVPool=ovp1 --UserName=emccode --DataStoreName=ds1 --VDCName=vdc1 --MethodName="
At this point, you can put the ECS nodes behind a load balancer and single IP/DNS name for traffic re-direction. Hooray!

Contribution

Create a fork of the project into your own reposity. Make all your necessary changes and create a pull request with a description on what was added or removed and details explaining the changes in lines of code. If approved, project owners will merge it.

Licensing

ecs-dockerswarm is freely distributed under the MIT License. See LICENSE for details.

Support

Please file bugs and issues on the Github issues page for this project. This is to help keep track and document everything related to this repo. For general discussions and further support you can join the EMC {code} Community slack channel. Lastly, for questions asked on Stackoverflow.com please tag them with EMC. The code and documentation are released with no warranties or SLAs and are intended to be supported through a community driven process.

Information

  • 24 Stars
  • 5 Forks
  • 1 Contributors
  • Python
  • From the {code} Blog

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    ecs-dockerswarm

    Deploy EMC's ECS as a multi-node Docker container setup using Docker Compose into a Docker Swarm cluster created by Docker Machine.

    Description

    EMC Elastic Cloud Storage (ECS) is a software-defined cloud storage platform that exposes S3, Swift, and Atmos endpoints. This walk-through will demonstate the setup of a 3 Node ECS Cluster using Docker containers and Docker tools.

    Requirements

    • Each ECS node requires 16GB of RAM and an attached volume with a minimum of 512GB. The attached volume stores persistent data that is replicated between three nodes.
    • Docker Machine installed on your local laptop. Use 0.3.0-rc2 or later Docker Machine Releases or until all --swarm commands are merged into a stable release.
    • Docker Compose installed on your local laptop. Use 1.3.0 RC2 or later Docker Compose Releases.
    • Docker Client installed on your local laptop. (follow Docker Client installation directions)
    This is for test and development purposes. Not for production use. Please reach out to your local EMC SE for information on production usage. EMC ECS ships as a commodity storage appliance for production use.

    Lets Get Going

    Setup 3 Ubuntu Hosts with Docker Swarm using Docker Machine

    The following examples use Ubuntu. Ubuntu is a requirement for using the setup scripts. Docker Machine examples are shown with the AWS driver with the standard Ubuntu AMI. However, any cloud or compatible infrastructure with Docker Machine can be used.
    1. At this beta stage, the security of ports hasn't been defined. For this to work properly, ports 0-65535 need opened inbound to each of your Docker Machine hosts. Within AWS, this is called a Security Group more port information can be found on the ECS Security Configuration Guide

    2. Create a Docker Swarm ID.

      1. This can be done by using docker run swarm:0.3.0-rc2 create on any host that can run Docker. If no host is available, use Docker Machine to create the host:
      docker-machine -D create --driver amazonec2 --amazonec2-access-key MYKEY --amazonec2-secret-key MYSECRETKEY --amazonec2-vpc-id vpc-myvpc swarm-create
      
      1. Connect to the Docker Machine: docker-machine env swarm-create
      2. Get shell access: eval "$(docker-machine env swarm-create)"
      3. Run the Swarm container: docker run swarm:0.3.0-rc2 create (currently must use the latest which is v0.3.0-rc2 to support Docker Compose)
      4. The output will have a unique token such as b353bb30194d59ab33e4d47c012ee895.
    3. Create a Docker Swarm 3 node cluster using Docker Machine. Each node requires:
      • a root drive of >=20GB
      • 28GB RAM or more
      • A Swarm token using image 0.3.0-rc2 or higher or until this is merged until this becomes the stable release
      1. Create Swarm Master:
      docker-machine -D create --driver amazonec2 --amazonec2-access-key MYKEY --amazonec2-secret-key MYSECRETKEY --amazonec2-vpc-id vpc-myvpc --amazonec2-instance-type r3.xlarge --amazonec2-root-size 50 --swarm --swarm-image=swarm:0.3.0-rc2 --swarm-master --swarm-discovery token://b353bb30194d59ab33e4d47c012ee895 swarm-master
      
      1. Create Node 01:
      docker-machine -D create --driver amazonec2 --amazonec2-access-key MYKEY --amazonec2-secret-key MYSECRETKEY --amazonec2-vpc-id vpc-myvpc --amazonec2-instance-type r3.xlarge --amazonec2-root-size 50 --swarm --swarm-image=swarm:0.3.0-rc2 --swarm-discovery token://b353bb30194d59ab33e4d47c012ee895 swarm-node01
      
      1. Create Node 02:
      docker-machine -D create --driver amazonec2 --amazonec2-access-key MYKEY --amazonec2-secret-key MYSECRETKEY --amazonec2-vpc-id vpc-myvpc --amazonec2-instance-type r3.xlarge --amazonec2-root-size 50 --swarm --swarm-image=swarm:0.3.0-rc2 --swarm-discovery token://b353bb30194d59ab33e4d47c012ee895 swarm-node02
      
    • note: The -D flag is used to look at diagnostics. It's not necessary, but helpful when looking for bugs since this all requires the Release Candidate versions of all tooling

    Add A Volume to Each Node

    Docker containers, by nature, are used for stateless applications. By attaching an outside volume (not the root volume), data persistence is achieved. The container running the ECS software is ephemeral and the volume containing the data can be attached to any ECS container. All ECS nodes replicate data to one another and store logs in this attached Volume. The volume needs to be >=512GB. After the volume has been added, retrieve the mounted path. For instance, AWS uses /dev/xvdf. This can be retrieved by using docker-machine ssh swarm-master "sudo fdisk -l", which shows the disk layout for the swarm-master machine. This example shows how to attach a volume using AWS.
    1. Login to the AWS Console
    2. Navigate to EC2 -> Volumes -> Create Volume
    3. Set the size to 512 or greater
    4. Set the Availability Zone to where your Docker Machine Hosts reside.
    5. Repeat this 2 more times so there are 3 Volumes
    6. Select 1 volume and navigate to Actions -> Attach Volume
    7. Attach 1 unique volume per Docker Machine Swarm host. Do not attach all three volumes to all three hosts.

    Prepare the hosts

    Each host requires a script to be ran that prepares the volumes attached as XFS and builds a multitude of folders and permissions.
    1. Using Docker Machine, download the setup script from this repo docker-machine ssh swarm-master "curl -O https://raw.githubusercontent.com/emccode/ecs-dockerswarm/master/docker-machine-hostprep.sh" docker-machine ssh swarm-node01 "curl -O https://raw.githubusercontent.com/emccode/ecs-dockerswarm/master/docker-machine-hostprep.sh" docker-machine ssh swarm-node02 "curl -O https://raw.githubusercontent.com/emccode/ecs-dockerswarm/master/docker-machine-hostprep.sh"
    2. The hosts require the internal IPs of all the ECS nodes in the cluster. You can retrieve all external IPs with docker-machine ls (not needed):
      NAME        ACTIVE   DRIVER      STATE     URL                     SWARM
      swarm-create   *   amazonec2   Running   tcp://52.4.23.123:2376
      swarm-master       amazonec2   Running   tcp://52.7.13.18:2376    swarm-master (master)
      swarm-node01       amazonec2   Running   tcp://54.12.23.16:2376   swarm-master
      swarm-node02       amazonec2   Running   tcp://52.7.19.173:2376   swarm-master
      
      You will need to go into your cloud provider and get the internal IP addresses for each node. This will hopefully be added to docker-machine in the near future. Pay attention to Issue #1342 FR: Get internal IP of cloud hosted machine for when it will be baked into the master release.

    3. The command to kick-off the host preparation accepts two arguments.

      1. all three internal IP addresses as comma seperated values with no spaces such as 172.38.13.18,172.38.23.16,172.38.19.173
      2. the mounted drive path without the /dev/ portion such as xvdf. If no argument is specified, xvdf is the default.
      docker-machine ssh swarm-master "sudo sh docker-machine-hostprep.sh 172.38.13.18,172.38.23.16,172.38.19.173 xvdf"
      docker-machine ssh swarm-node01 "sudo sh docker-machine-hostprep.sh 172.38.13.18,172.38.23.16,172.38.19.173 xvdf"
      docker-machine ssh swarm-node02 "sudo sh docker-machine-hostprep.sh 172.38.13.18,172.38.23.16,172.38.19.173 xvdf"
      
    4. The last output line will say Host has been successfully prepared

    Docker Compose Up

    The docker-compose.yml file will create 3 ECS containers including all volume mounts and networking.
    1. Connect to the Docker Machine Swarm instance: docker-machine env --swarm swarm-master
    2. Get shell access to the Swarm Cluster: eval "$(docker-machine env --swarm swarm-master)"
    3. To test if swarm is working correctly, run docker info and you will see an output such as:
    Containers: 4
    Images: 3
    Storage Driver:
    Strategy: spread
    Filters: affinity, health, constraint, port, dependency
    Nodes: 3
     swarm-master: 52.7.13.18:2376
      └ Containers: 2
      └ Reserved CPUs: 0 / 4
      └ Reserved Memory: 0 B / 15.42 GiB
     swarm-node01: 54.12.23.16:2376
      └ Containers: 1
      └ Reserved CPUs: 0 / 4
      └ Reserved Memory: 0 B / 15.42 GiB
     swarm-node02: 52.7.19.173:2376
      └ Containers: 1
      └ Reserved CPUs: 0 / 4
      └ Reserved Memory: 0 B / 15.42 GiB
    Execution Driver:
    Kernel Version:
    Operating System:
    CPUs: 12
    Total Memory: 94.38 GiB
    Name:
    ID:
    Http Proxy:
    Https Proxy:
    No Proxy:
    
    1. Copy this repo using git clone https://github.com/emccode/ecs-dockerswarm.git or save the docker-compose.yml file to a folder.
    2. Navigate to your folder such as ecs-dockerswarm
    3. Run docker-compose up -d. Docker Compose will be pointing towards the registerd Docker Client machine which is our swarm cluster:
    Pulling ecsnode02 (emccorp/ecs-software)...
    swarm-node01: Pulling emccorp/ecs-software... : downloaded
    swarm-node02: Pulling emccorp/ecs-software... : downloaded
    swarm-master: Pulling emccorp/ecs-software... : downloaded
    Creating ecsdockerswarm_ecsnode02_1...
    Creating ecsdockerswarm_ecsnode03_1...
    Creating ecsdockerswarm_ecsnode01_1...
    
    1. Make sure all containers are up using docker ps and wait 10-15 minutes for ECS to completely load.
    CONTAINER ID        IMAGE                      COMMAND                CREATED             STATUS              PORTS               NAMES
    9054fc14ee5a        emccorp/ecs-software   "/opt/vipr/boot/boot   36 seconds ago      Up 35 seconds                           swarm-master/ecsdockerswarm_ecsnode01_1
    a90ef32ce5ec        emccorp/ecs-software   "/opt/vipr/boot/boot   39 seconds ago      Up 38 seconds                           swarm-node01/ecsdockerswarm_ecsnode02_1
    e6356782748c        emccorp/ecs-software   "/opt/vipr/boot/boot   39 seconds ago      Up 38 seconds                           swarm-node02/ecsdockerswarm_ecsnode03_1
    
    Warning docker-compose.yml calls out the use of affinity rules based on the container name. If the container name is changed within the docker-compose.yml file, then the environment variable needs to be edited as well.

    ECS UI Access

    After a few minutes, the ECS UI will be available. To access the UI, point your browser to one of the Public IP addresses using https://. You can retrieve all external IPs with docker-machine ls (not needed): NAME ACTIVE DRIVER STATE URL SWARM swarm-create amazonec2 Running tcp://52.4.23.123:2376 swarm-master amazonec2 Running tcp://52.7.13.18:2376 swarm-master (master) swarm-node01 amazonec2 Running tcp://54.12.23.16:2376 swarm-master swarm-node02 amazonec2 Running tcp://52.7.19.173:2376 swarm-master Username: root Password: ChangeMe ecs-login-ui

    ECS Object Preparation

    At this point, there are still more steps to be completed like adding the license.xml, creating the object store, etc. These steps have been automated in object_prep.py. This script only needs to be run once per cluster. Download two files to one of the hosts:
    docker-machine ssh swarm-master "curl -O https://raw.githubusercontent.com/emccode/ecs-dockerswarm/master/license.xml"
    docker-machine ssh swarm-master "curl -O https://raw.githubusercontent.com/emccode/ecs-dockerswarm/master/object_prep.py"
    
    Next, run the python script. In the ECSNodes flag, specify the Public IP address of one of the nodes. This script will take about 10-15 minutes to complete. Do not exit out of the script
    docker-machine ssh swarm-master "sudo python object_prep.py --ECSNodes=52.7.13.18 --Namespace=ns1 --ObjectVArray=ova1 --ObjectVPool=ovp1 --UserName=emccode --DataStoreName=ds1 --VDCName=vdc1 --MethodName="
    
    At this point, you can put the ECS nodes behind a load balancer and single IP/DNS name for traffic re-direction. Hooray!

    Contribution

    Create a fork of the project into your own reposity. Make all your necessary changes and create a pull request with a description on what was added or removed and details explaining the changes in lines of code. If approved, project owners will merge it.

    Licensing

    ecs-dockerswarm is freely distributed under the MIT License. See LICENSE for details.

    Support

    Please file bugs and issues on the Github issues page for this project. This is to help keep track and document everything related to this repo. For general discussions and further support you can join the EMC {code} Community slack channel. Lastly, for questions asked on Stackoverflow.com please tag them with EMC. The code and documentation are released with no warranties or SLAs and are intended to be supported through a community driven process.

    From the {code} Blog

    More related posts on the {code} Blog

    From the {code} Blog

    More related posts on the {code} Blog